Everything’s bigger in Texas- and this year, voter turnout numbers are upholding that adage as Democrats hope to turn the state blue in a presidential election for the first time since 1976.

Typically the state has posted among the lowest voter turnout numbers in the nation, but this year turnout has surged with groups such as youth voters, doubling their share of the vote from 2016 thus far.

USC communications professor Thomas Hollihan says Texas' changing electoral outlook is due to changes in the local population.

“Yeah, I mean, I think there’s a demographics tsumani that’s confronting the Republican Party in places like Texas where it’s beginning to happen. It happened in Nevada a few years ago. It’s happening in Arizona at about the same time now. I think Texas will see some changes that, desperate attempts to suppress. The votes are a clear sign that the Republican Party knows that it’s in trouble in Texas.”

Yet in this election, University of Texas student Pay Prostok even sees wavering party allegiance among traditionally Republican voters

“I know my parents have friends who have been registered Republicans their entire lives who are voting for a Democrat for the first time ever at the age of 60 at the age of 50."

“I think it has a really good chance of turning blue. It’ll just be up to, I think, young voters and white women who have in the past been Republican who decide to do it. And then obviously minority voters"

The Biden campaign sent vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris to Texas to try to pick up some more Democrat votes.

Joe Biden winning Texas' 38 electoral votes would probably be a death knell to President Trump’s reelection campaign.

Any Democratic advantage in the Lone Star State would be a great threat for Republican candidates trying to gain an electoral college majority in the future.

The day before the election, The Real Clear Politics average has President Trump leading Joe Biden by a slim 1.2% in Texas.