With November 3rd just around the corner, voter turnout has increased in spite of the ongoing pandemic. Less than a week left to vote and people in different states continue to find/come up with unique ways to encourage voting.

Here are some brilliant Latinx ‘artivists’ who are motivating those in our community to vote through their art.

Art by Gaby Flores from San Antonio, Texas

How would you describe your art?

“I would describe my work as engaging and challenging. I want people to see it and feel something. Whether it is to be active in the process, start deeper discussions in our communities, or simply participate.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

“I come from a state with historically low voting numbers. The narrative for years has been that our vote doesn’t matter so why bother. This is furthest from the truth! Our communities need us to speak up and take charge. If the Latinx vote didn’t matter there wouldn’t be so much effort put into silencing it. This year, Texas is seeing record breaking Latinx and youth voting numbers. We are tired of not being seen. We are here and we are Americans. We demand to be treated as such. We must elect officials on local, state, and national levels that represent all people. We must act to change the world we live in. We can not accept discrimination, racism, violence, and hatred towards minority groups as the norm. It is not okay! It will never be okay! ¡SU VOTO ES SU VOZ!”

Art by Alex Izaguirre, also known as Mamút, who was born and raised in Venezuela and is now an American citizen living in Miami, Florida.

How would you describe your art?

“My art is a product of my biggest influences and what inspires me, being music, art, politics and hispanic culture.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

“Because it is our right! Through the years the community has fought so hard to be counted and represented, the least we can do is go out and vote and make sure our voice is heard loud. Please vote for our jobs, our children, our parents and grandparents and most importantly our future!”

Art by Desiree Sabrina Garcia from Los Angeles and is Mexican and Salvadorian.

How would you describe your art?

“I’m not exactly sure how to describe my art as I just started less than 3 months ago and I am still learning and paving my way. However, I do know that I want to create art for the Latinx community, women, and young creators hoping to get into digital art. I want my artwork to be relatable to the Latinx community and make everyone feel connected.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

“I believe it’s important for the Latinx community to vote because our voice deserves to be heard. Voting is the most effective way for our voice to be heard about issues that matter to us and our community. With the election being days away, I encourage the Latinx community to go out and vote, tell your friends/family to vote, help first time voters, and talk about these issues and the importance of voting. When we vote, things change. We can no longer stay silent anymore.”

Art by Florencio Zavala who was born in Oregon, grew up in Florida and has lived in LA for almost 20 years. His family is originally from Guanajuato, MX.

How would you describe your art?

“Graphic activism. I enjoy working fast and responding to current events, topics and movements. I have a background in design and spent the past decade in advertising so I’m keen to how things are marketed and sold - I navigate a space that pulls from art, history, design, semiotics, analytics and branding. The output can be a logo, a meme, a poster, a sign, animation, or whatever best suits the idea.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

“It’s important that all registered voters participate. Latinx voters should vote because their voices matter and help inform the electorate as a whole. In a few decades their numbers will eclipse all other groups in the US. We can influence policy by voting, to ensure people have equal rights and the opportunity to seek citizenship. We must vote to change the narrative. All our votes matter. Don’t take it for granted - freedom comes with responsibility. Make a plan. Bring a friend. Help someone who needs it. Vota.”

Art by Nanzi Medrano from Los Angeles, California. She was raised in the border region of San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico.

How would you describe your art?

“My vision as an artivist is to engage viewers in conversations that help them to understand that change begins with each of us. This is the first time I have created and use digital drawing to deliver a political message. These drawings' objective is to remind myself and viewers to take the time and learn about all the propositions in the ballot and how they will affect us as individuals and community.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

“Many people said that voting is a privilege, but it is not, it is a right. History has shown just that citizens of color fought and died for this right. With these digital drawings, I am honoring the past, taking action in the present, and inspiring the future for better opportunities for folks of color. For this reason, I encourage Latinx folks to vote. Exercise your right to vote. Whether you believe in the voting system or not, the result will affect you directly and our communities. To all my Latinx communities, go vote! Este es solo el comienzo y votar es el primer paso. La Lucha sigue y continuará!”

Art by Mariana Lopez who was born in El Paso, Texas. She grew up in Chihuahua, Chihuahua Mexico and moved to the U.S. for college 10 years ago and has been here ever since.

How would you describe your art?

“I would describe my art as colorful, vibrant and relatable.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

“It’s very important because we have been historically underrepresented in government, education and business. The latinx community is extremely diverse and has a unique set of challenges, barriers and opportunities for growth. We need to be represented politically so that our leaders can understand and address these challenges. Voting is the most powerful way for our voices to be heard. Sigamos luchando! The Latinx community will keep thriving so long as we continue to support one another.”

Art by José G. González who was born in Nayarit, Mexico and currently resides in California.

How would you describe your art?

“My art is varied, with different influences, but large honoring key cultural sources and in the context of a story. It is a way for me to express a narrative and way of being in the world as a bicultural, ambicultural, and quantum cultural code-switching Chicano.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

Because if we are eligible, that comes with a responsibility to consider the greater good of the community as well, especially since we have many in the community who are not eligible to vote for a variety of reasons. This election has a record number of eligible Latinx voters. Voting is imperfect. It does not take the place of other organizations and it’s an act within a system not originally designed with us in mind. However, to not vote when we can is to reinforce the idea that we cannot express ourselves as a multi-issue and multi-action community. Increased representation comes with increased responsibility. We have a role in the shaping of the future of this country."

Art by Joffre Contreras, an Ecuadorian who moved to the states when he was 7 and is now based in New York.

How would you describe your art?

“I would describe my art as being rooted in Latin America and developed in New York. A mixture of two cultures.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

“It is extremely important for the Latinx community to vote because we have got to flex our voting power. If we all came out to vote there would not be anything stopping us from having a reflective, inclusive, and accountable government. We have a huge responsibility to vote because a lot of us know someone that can’t vote due to their legal status.”

Art by Jessica Vargas who was born in Los Angeles, CA, raised in Fort Worth, Texas and gone back and forth since!

How would you describe your art?

“Two-dimensional, because it’s intricate detailed art, that you can EAT! The best of both worlds and I love that my cookies are always celebrating a milestone or occasion that’s special to someone.”

Why is it important to you that Latinx folk vote?

“I am a first generation Hispanic American and I didn’t grow up thinking that I SHOULD vote, or that it even mattered. As soon as I was able to vote, I did, because I am American and I recognized the importance when the time came. Especially voting in 2012 for the first time. It’s empowering just to be able to vote in this country, it’s not something that should be taken for granted. We are such a huge part of this amazingly diverse country, and it’s important that we feel a part of democracy. The best thing we can do is vote. Whatever happens in this election, I think it’s important that we move forward with kindness. We are in dark times with so many important issues at stake all while battling a virus. Let’s stay safe as a community and do our best to stay positive and work towards a brighter future of unity.”

We hope that these artists inspired you to vote if you can and if you haven’t already.