Dorothy Butler Gilliam was in her mid-twenties when she landed her dream gig at the Washington Post. The year was 1961, and while integration in the District of Columbia had not happened yet, there were two other Black people working in the newsroom at the time — both men.

Dorothy Gilliam (credit: Kea Dupree Photography)
Dorothy Gilliam (credit: Kea Dupree Photography)

Gilliam experienced one challenge after another. Her fellow reporters barely acknowledged her existence. She could not eat lunch at any of the nearby restaurants due to segregation. And catching a cab back to the office to file her articles on time proved almost impossible.

Nevertheless, she persisted. Gilliam recounts those stories and many others in her new book, Trailblazer: A Pioneering Journalist's Fight to Make the Media Look More Like Americaout now on Center Street/Hachette Book Group.

Match Volume co-host Tracii McGregor with Dorothy Gilliam in the Media Center at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism (credit: Julia Wilson)
Match Volume co-host Tracii McGregor with Dorothy Gilliam in the Media Center at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism (credit: Julia Wilson)