At the end of last week's episode of "Girls," Hannah (Lena Dunham) was shaken in her convictions about having a baby after seeing how much of a mixed blessing her own existence was to her mother. Being belittled by Elijah (Andrew Rannells) didn't help either. In "Full Disclosure," the final season's midway point, Hannah has gained a sense of calm about the whole affair. She still wants to have the baby, and it will probably turn out all right (she hopes).

The episode opens with Hannah telling Marnie (Allison Williams) about the pregnancy. Marnie's life has grown steadily chaotic over the last few seasons and she's become incredibly self-centered, almost to the point of being unrecognizable, but Hannah still views her as the most stable of her friends. Maybe the earlier, more responsible version of Marnie would object to Hannah having a baby, but she's all for it. It's the first positive reaction Hannah has gotten so far.

After Hannah tells Marnie, Elijah apologizes for yelling at her and tells her he doesn't think she'll be that bad of a mother. Elijah has become a major part of Hannah's life ever since he moved in, and Hannah has conceived of him as some kind of close uncle ever since she decided to keep the baby.

But after two positive experiences about the pregnancy, Hannah finds Adam (Adam Driver) lurking outside her apartment. He's completed his short film (the horribly titled "Full Dis:Closure") and wants her to watch it. The act of making the film provided him with catharsis and closure, and he seems to think that he and Hannah have some unfinished business that requires her to watch the film as well. Perhaps this would be a way to salvage some kind of friendship from the wreckage of their relationship, but it also seems as if it might merely dredge up the parts Hannah most wants to forget. When Adam refuses to give up and leave her alone, Hannah mentions the pregnancy, leaving him mostly speechless.

Of course, once Adam knows, Jessa (Jemima Kirke) knows. She visits Hannah's apartment to both express her sorrow at not being told and to offer to support Hannah. The two have had a rocky friendship since the end of Season 2, when Jessa abandoned Hannah just as her mental health crisis went into full bloom. But Jessa is also Hannah's oldest friend, and she understands that something about that can't be completely wiped away by the hurt she's caused Hannah (or her own sociopathy). But Hannah has no interest in rekindling their friendship.

Meanwhile, Marnie is stuck playing a gig at her mom's friend's birthday in New Jersey. It's a sad little club, and not at all the place for the kind of music she and Desi (Ebon Moss-Bachrach) make. When Desi arrives on his motorcycle, he's too stoned to play the gig, so her mother Evie (Rita Wilson) steps in. She knows all the lyrics and chords for their songs, and she can sing back up in Desi's place. Except she doesn't actually sing back-up, she just doubles Marnie's parts. When her friend slips out, Evie falls into a hilarious bit of scatting just to draw attention back to the stage. Marnie has fallen far in the course of "Girls," and this seems like it might be a rock bottom moment for her, the point where she's most aware of her descent. As funny as Williams has been playing the self-absorbed and aimless version of Marnie, it also seemed like a betrayal to the character's more realist roots. Perhaps the show will try to course correct for the final half of the season.

At the episode's end, Hannah finally gives in and tries to call Paul-Louis. She's been debating whether to tell him about the pregnancy. But when she's stymied by an unhelpful operator, she decides to watch "Full Dis:Closure" instead. "Great, it's porno," she says about the opening minutes of Adam and her doppelganger having sex, a knowing joke on the criticism "Girls" gets for frank depictions of sex. She lets it play as Adam and "Mira" talk afterward. The words are probably made up, but the emotions register on her face; she remembers these feelings. There's a shot after her stand-in leaves where Adam just stares into the camera, but he seems to be looking right at Hannah. "The bed's getting cold," he says.

What to make of this? Is the ending a suggestion that Hannah still has feelings for Adam (or vice versa)? And what is the significance of the fact that Hannah connects with Adam (via his movie) after she fails to get through to Paul-Louis? Kathryn VanArendonk has an interesting piece up on Vulture exploring the possibility of a Hannah-Adam endgame. I'm not convinced that's what Lena Dunham has in mind, and it's certainly too early to say, but it's an interesting proposition. Dunham and Driver have always had amazing chemistry, and her writing for them as a couple was often among her sharpest work, but it seems like too much has been torn apart between them for any kind of romantic reconciliation. We'll just have to wait to see.

Watch the preview for "Full Disclosure" below:

"Girls" airs Sundays on HBO at 10 p.m.

Reach Staff Reporter Brian Marks here.