In regards to communication, I think the key is to over-communicate. This is advice I heard from day one, and it couldn't be more true. That comes straight from the producers; we are the anchors of communication so to speak. I'm sure it can get annoying, and believe me it is annoying to have to do, but there is no downside whatsoever to over-communicating, and a lot can go wrong when it doesn't happen.

But it's not just about over-communicating, it's about timing as well. In the media world, and in our media center, there are always updates and changes. It's important to constantly update, or communicate if you will, everyone who may possibly need to know about the changes to maximize production. For example, as lead producer yesterday I was responsible for choosing and writing the preshows and teases, which are ten-second blurbs about what stories are to come in our broadcast. I needed to change one of them as the show approached because we still didn't have the necessary video for it. So I wrote in the change, and knew I needed to tell my fellow producers as well as the volunteers who were helping to edit the video. The first thing I did was get the executive producer, Eli, to look over what I wrote to get approval. It wasn't going to take long at all, however there were several people affected by the change who needed to know immediately. I figured I would tell them as soon as Eli approved the script. But as we started working on it, several people came running over to me aggressively asking about the change. At first I was surprised and figured their commotion was a bit much.

A preshow tease from Monday’s broadcast
A preshow tease from Monday’s broadcast

However, I soon realized that when there is a change that affects other people, it is only fair, even necessary, to inform everyone right away. It isn't right to keep people waiting, even if there are other things that need to be dealt with that may even have a higher priority. As a lead producer, I not only preside over my own responsibilities but everyone else's as well. And that's how it's supposed to be; that comes with the job territory. There are two solutions to these kinds of issues. One would be to take the lazy route and not to change anything, particularly when it involves communicating that change to others. The other is to always be on point and timely communicating any changes that are needed.

The latter is the only option.