As the presidential race begins its final month, Californians and people across the nation have only two weeks to make a decision about candidates up and down the ballot. The deadline to register to vote has already passed, but Annenberg Media compiled this guide to help make sure you can cast your ballot.

Absentee deadlines:

Texas: Request for an absentee ballot must be made by Friday, Oct 28. Ballots must be returned by Tuesday, Nov. 8.

New York: Request for an absentee ballot must be made by Tuesday, Nov. 1. Ballots must be postmarked by Monday, Nov. 7 and received by Tuesday, Nov. 15.

Illinois: Request for an absentee ballot must be made by Thursday, Nov. 2. Ballots must be returned by Tuesday, Nov. 8.

Washington: Not needed. All Elections in Washington are Vote-by-mail. All voting must be done by Tuesday, Nov. 8.

Florida: Request for an absentee ballot must be made by Wednesday, Nov. 2. Ballots must be returned by Tuesday, Nov. 8.

New Jersey: Request for an absentee ballot must by made by Tuesday, Nov. 1. Ballots must be returned by Tuesday, Nov. 8.

Arizona: Request for an absentee ballot must be made by Friday, Oct. 28. Ballots must be returned by Tuesday, Nov. 8.

Early voting:

Thirty-four states and the District of Columbia allow residents to vote before Nov. 8. The time period for early voting varies from state to state. Voting early in California depends on the county you are registered with. In Los Angeles County, early voting begins 29 days before Election Day and takes place at the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk building in Norwalk, CA.

All L.A county voters are eligible to vote early on October 29-30 and November 5-6. The county election office is located at 12400 Imperial Highway in Norwalk, CA on the third floor in room 3002. The Norwalk office is open from 8 a.m to 4 p.m on these dates, as are five other locations in L.A County including West Covina City Hall, West Los Angeles College, North Hollywood Regional Library, El Camino College and Antelope Valley College.

Citizens can also cast their vote by mail. Voters will need to fill out an online application to vote by mail.

Postage and Stamps:

Whether you're voting absentee or voting early, you must get your ballot into the mailbox. The good news is: when mailed from any U.S. post office, U.S. embassy or consulate or APO/FPO mail facility, the hardcopy ballot form is postage-paid. This means that you don't need to go out and buy stamps! However, stamps can be found at any USPS location as well as most banks, grocery stores and gas stations.

Here are the closest locations to find stamps near USC:

  • Mail Stop at Parking Structure X (PSX) near McCarthy Quad
  • USPS, across from campus on Vermont Ave.
  • Ralphs, on Vermont Ave.
  • CVS, on Figueroa St. under Gateway

Once you have completed the ballot and are ready to send it off, there are five postal collection box locations at the USC University Park Campus to bring it to:

  1. Parking Structure A – 3667 McClintock Avenue
  2. Parking Structure C (PSX) – 620 West McCarthy Way
  3. Parking Structure D – 649 West 34th Street
  4. Bovard Administration – 3551 Trousdale Parkway
  5. University Parking Center (UPX) – 3434 South Hope Street

Election Day:

Election Day is on November 8, 2016. Polling locations for in-person voting will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

What you need to bring:

Photo ID, utility bill, or government issued document with name and residence address

If you have voted before in CA, you do not need ID to vote in-person. However, if you registered to vote by mail and did not include your driver's license number, CA ID number, or the last 4 digits of your Social Security number, you must bring an acceptable form of ID.

The easiest polling location for USC students and the surrounding South Central community to cast their ballot is at the Ronald Tutor Campus Center on USC's University Park campus.

An increase in voter registration has prompted concern about how polling places will handle the mass number of voting in person on election day. According to the L.A County Registrar of Voters, there will be 25,000 volunteers working at the polling locations in L.A County to ensure the day runs smoothly.