As large demonstrations were held across the nation to protest this week's shootings of black men in Oklahoma and North Carolina, dozens gathered in Compton on Thursday in response to the fatal deputy shooting of Donte Taylor.

Taylor, a 31-year-old black man, was fatally shot by Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies on August 25 following a foot chase in Compton, according to a press release by the sheriff's department.

(Sabrina Yam/USC Annenberg Media)
(Sabrina Yam/USC Annenberg Media)

Authorities say Taylor was standing in the 400 block of Wilmington Avenue when he ran off after being approached by deputies. Taylor then allegedly pointed a gun at the deputies before they opened fire. However, no weapon was recovered, said Lt. Steve Jauch.

"We want to let the world know that Donte's life matters, and we have no confidence in the Sheriff Department doing that investigation so we are asking for an independent investigation," said Pastor K.S. Tulloss, Western Regional Director at the National Action Network and Donte Taylor's uncle.

(Sabrina Yam/USC Annenberg Media)
(Sabrina Yam/USC Annenberg Media)

At the rally, held outside the LASD Compton station, protesters chanted, "We want justice!" and spilled onto the streets, blocking Willowbrook Avenue.

"This is an injustice. We've had conflicts with the police here for as long as I can remember," said Taylor's cousin, who declined to be named.

Tammy Wilkins, who also attended the rally, said, "We want justice for what happened [to Taylor], we don't want this swept under the rug. We want to do it peacefully, but we want justice."



“No justice no peace!” -demonstrators outside @lacountysheriff in Compton pic.twitter.com/FfBFsYkNIk

— IntersectionsSouthLA (@southlareport) September 22, 2016

The rally was hosted by the National Action Network Los Angeles, Churches in Action, NAACP Compton and Taylor's family. The NAN also hosted a rally in Leimert Park on Wednesday night in light of the shootings of Terence Crutcher in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina.

"It's time to highlight the tragedies of young people in our communities," said Tulloss. "This pain that's been felt within Charlotte and Oklahoma, and the pain that's been felt here, locally in Compton and around Los Angeles, show that our young people's lives matter."

Lt. Jauch said the investigation into Taylor's death continues.

Reporters Sabrina Yam and Keith Demolder contributed to this story.

Reach Staff Reporter Erin Rode here. Follow her on Twitter here.